Crossing the Wall: Returning to Ancelstierre

I’m not sure where this tradition began, but I like to take time out from my usual (frenetic) reading schedule and pop back to my childhood for a while. I normally pick a series I remember adoring and re-read the entire confection in a short space of time.

For the first few days of January this year, I wasn’t too enthused about the real world. I didn’t want any non-fiction in my life for a few days and I was on the lookout for a good escape.

I somehow hadn’t heard that Garth Nix had released a new book, but was wandering through Forbidden Planet on London’s Shaftesbury Avenue when I came across Goldenhand on a shelf and instantly recognised it as part of the Old Kingdom series. Images of a young woman walking in Death crossed my mind and later that evening, I sat down to get re-acquainted with Sabriel.

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Re-Climbing the Magic Faraway Tree

As a child, I stumbled across a miracle book. There was a bright place in the woods where a giant tree stretched to the clouds, its branches hosting a plethora of whimsical residents. The magic spilled out of every page and I read, and re-read, and read it again. It was called The Enchanted Wood. I was 6 years old, I’d just found Enid Blyton, and the world exploded.

Arguably, the adventures of Jo, Bessie, and Fanny were my introduction to fantasy, a genre that I adore to this day. I had no idea, reading The Farway Tree series in 1996, that it had been written in the 1940s. The world was at war a second time, hardship was everyone’s neighbor, and Enid Blyton was producing stories that would, for generations, help young people imagine a better, brighter place.

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